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Abendmusik, New York’s Early Music String Band

2019-2020 Season

Abendmusik web

Judson Griffin, Małgorzata Ziemnicka, violins
Lawrence Lipnik, Patricia Ann Neely, violas da gamba

Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares Figured in Seaven Passionate Pavans and several other dances
by John Dowland Bacheler of Musicke

with guests:
Christopher Morrongiello, lute
Rosamund Morley, viola da gamba

There is no doubt that one of the most popular melodies associated with the Elizabethan period is John Dowland’s setting of “Lachrimae” or “Flow My Teares.” The descending 4-note motive has, over time, come to symbolize sadness and melancholy and has been adopted by composers who flourished in the Renaissance period through the modern age. Dowland published his collection, “Lachrimae or Seaven Teares Figured in Seaven Passionate Pavans,” around 1605 when he was in the service of the King of Denmark, Christian IV. He dedicated the collection to Christian’s sister Anne who, upon her marriage to James I, became Queen of Scotland, England, and Ireland.

“The seven pavans that begin Lachrimæ are among the best-known and best-loved pieces of instrumental music written before the eighteenth century. Their serene beauty speaks for itself, yet they also raise many questions. Why are there seven of them? How are they related? Do they contain ideas borrowed from other composers? Were they intended to be performed as a cycle? What is the significance of the Latin titles? Do they [the titles] have any bearing on their musical character? How does the cycle exemplify the Elizabethan cult of melancholy?” – Peter Holman, Dowland: Lachrimae (1604), Cambridge Music Handbooks, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999, p. 36.

Join Abendmusik as it explores the music from this collection, addresses the questions about its provenance and place in music history, and Dowland’s relationship with Denmark and England, which appears to have been more than just an artistic one.

Part of the seventh New York Early Music Celebration, "Ex Borealis - Nordic and Baltic Countries," sponsored by the Early Music Foundation.

Friday, October 11 at 7:30 pm
The Svenska Church
5 East 48th Street
Manhattan

Tickets:
$20 general; $10 students & seniors

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Roman Holiday

After the disaster of the sack of Rome in 1527 the Popes were intent on seeing the city rebuilt in every sense. They and competing wealthy families bestowed lavish patronage, so that Rome in the 16th and 17th centuries became a major cultural capital. Countless artists came from all over Europe, examples being the painters Ribera from Spain and Poussin and Lorrain from France; the work of the Neapolitan sculptor and architect Bernini, primarily associated with Rome, is the epitome of baroque art. Musicians working there who composed instrumental ensemble music include Palestrina, Cavalieri, Gregorio Allegri, Leoni, Frescobaldi, Alessandro Scarlatti, Stradella, Kapsperger, Colista, and Corelli.

Join Abendmusik for a program that reflects the contributions of artists who built the rich cultural center worthy as a destination for a Roman holiday.

Friday, March 6 at 8 pm
The Church of St. Luke in the Fields
487 Hudson Street
Manhattan

Tickets:
$20 general; $10 students & seniors

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Music from the Kroměříž Archive

with guest:
John Mark Rozendaal, viola da gamba

Some of the most popular, original and striking of all 5-part music is that of Heinrich Schmelzer, Biber, and Biber's colleague Pavel Vejvanovský. The greatest source of their works in manuscript is the remarkable collection at the seemingly obscure court of Kroměřiž in Moravia, like Salzburg the seat of a prince-archbishop. Vejvanovský, in his capacity as librarian and copyist, is largely to thank for assembling this vast corpus of music. His connections with the court of the Holy Roman Emperor in Vienna ensured both the performance of Czech music in the capital and the preservation of the works of Viennese composers — chiefly Schmelzer's — that would otherwise likely be lost.

Friday, May 22 at 8 pm
The Church of St. Luke in the Fields
487 Hudson Street
Manhattan

Tickets:
$20 general; $10 students & seniors

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GEMS is a non-profit corporation that supports and promotes the artists and organizations in New York devoted to early music— the music of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical periods.